Entries by Tag presentation

Oct 07, 2021

entries sorted by tags. (also see entries by date.)

A lawyer, a scientist, and a kid walk into a makerspace
Exploring the power of informal learning academies. more
Annual Global Spatial Data Infrastructure Conference
Back to the Future of Data Sharing
Scientists have always shared data, just not freely, and not with *anyone* who wants the data. For the most part, scientists have shared data with their collaborators, and on occasion, with those who might especially ask them for it. But as science has become more data-intensive, and as the technologies, mainly the network speeds and computing power, to collect, manage, analyze and visualize data, have become more powerful and ubiquitous, the sharing has not kept pace. The relatively recent awareness of intellectual property rights in data have at times brought about a contrarian change — scientists applying unsuitable licenses to their content creating an unintended but significant legal hurdle. All this confusion makes it seem that the goal of seamless data sharing between those who create it and those who want it may be moving further away from our grasp. So what is one to do? more
Basics of GIS
I gave the following "lecture" to a bunch of IIT students visiting University of Waterloo under a program organized by <a href="http://www.cs.uwaterloo.ca/~keshav/">Srinivasan Keshav</a>. more
Citizen-Sourced Data Commons
governance implications for <b>Open Science</b> more
Citizens Consent
An idea for more informed citizens based more
Community Ontology
exploring ontology relevant in the context of a community. more
Dashboard Data Model
A small presentation on data models that can be repurposed for many different end-uses. more
Data Apps
Don't make web apps, make data apps. more
Demystifying Blockchains
you keep on using that term “blockchain.” I don’t think it means what you think it means more
Ethics and Integrity of Data Collection and Sharing
A lot of people talk of licensing data. That is usually not applicable (as data are not licensable, at least not on the basis of copyright), and it is also possibly misleading. There are just as much, if not more, important issues of integrity and ethics, in both gathering and sharing data that come into play, particularly if humans are involved (whether the humans are the ones gathering the data or humans are the subjects of the data gathering exercise). more
The Future of Science is Open
While open sharing of scientific tools, data and findings is morally and strategically good for science, it is also strategically good for countries where resources are constrained. Being able to reuse tools and data makes economic sense, and building upon existing work accelerates the development of a world-class scientific community and of scientific knowledge itself. more
Geo vs. Medical/Health
a comparison between the geo and medical related activies in the open source world. more
Geottingen
Present and future geo activities at Göttingen more
Interoperability As A Guiding Principle For Long-Term Archives
Archive '10 focused on the creation of archives of computer-based experiments – capturing and publishing entire experiments that are fully encapsulated, ready for immediate replay, and open to inspection. It brought together a few areas of the scientific community that represent fairly advanced infrastructure for archiving experiments and data (physicists and biomedical researchers) with two areas of the computer systems community for which significant progress is still needed (networks and compilers). The workshop also included experts in enabling technologies and publishing. more
Legal Implications of Text and Data Mining
Originally created by the Creative Commons Science, Policy and Legal teams, subsequently revised by me for the web. more
Measuring Information Accessibility
Can we recognize free when we see it? Can we measure accessibility? Can we rate one source of information as being more or less accessible than another? more
Open Access, Open Source, Open Data
All intellectual output of science can be categorized into literature, software and data. This presentation examines these three pillars, and explores what it means to be "open" as a commitment to practicing open science. more
Open But Unequal
An open ecosystem is vital for science, society and citizens
Open Science in HSR
Policy Issues in Accessibility and Interoperability of Scientific Data
Public Good v. Private Goods
The good news is that the private sector is taking over from the public agencies when it comes to innovation and investment in the medical/health domains. As such, the difficult but crucial technological advancements, especially when it comes to balancing the desire for sharing with the need for privacy, are going to come from the private sector. The bad thing is that we are already witnessing unintended side-effects to this. And the ugly part is that there will be many more undesirable consequences in the future. The necessary checks and balances—consent, governance, and reparations from harm—will have to come from the public sector, that is, both the government and the common people. more
The Role of Licensing in Science
Scalable Data Sharing in GeoSciences
Sharing v. Privacy
While the need for privacy and security have to be respected, access to patient data is essential for continuous learning as well as for diagnosis of edge cases. But the former makes it difficult to achieve the latter creating a tension that seems intractable. A workshop organized by Creative Commons, with generous support from Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, brought together those eager to resolve this tension, and make it possible to share data while respecting privacy. more
Twenty Things I Care About
What Can SDI Learn From Open Source
I gave a presentation at the GSDI9 conference in [Santiago de Chile]. The disconnect between most of the folks who think SDI and open source was very apparent. I talked about the concept of a [Spatial Data Commons] based on the presentation on [Global Information Commons] by [Paul Uhlir]. The idea of a spatial data commons was received very well by the audience. more
What Would Schumpeter Think Of Open Source
What’s in a Name
why names matter in taxonomy, and how technology can help. more
Who Owns My Data?
Ownership, legally defined as a bundle of rights in the thing that is owned, arises from some provision in either common law or in statute that gives us rights in that thing in the first place. We own land because we bought it or we inherited it from someone who bought it or either we or our ancestors laid claim to it in the absence of anyone else contesting our claim. Similarly, we own other property because we bought it we were gifted it or we inherited it. If there are competing claims to our property, our own claim is weakened until we can prove otherwise. We own statutory rights in intellectual property based on our authorship of that work with sufficient creativity. However, none of these characteristics define health data. We produce health data through the act of existing, but we don’t have any creativity in it. The only thing we have is a right to privacy that gives us the prerogative to deny the use of our data by others. The question then becomes – should we own our health data or not? and what would be implications of doing so one way or another? more
eInfrastructure for Scientific Data
Sharing v. Privacy
While the need for privacy and security have to be respected, access to patient data is essential for continuous learning as well as for diagnosis of edge cases. But the former makes it difficult to achieve the latter creating a tension that seems intractable. A workshop organized by Creative Commons, with generous support from Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, brought together those eager to resolve this tension, and make it possible to share data while respecting privacy. more